Come to the hui!

The draft programme for this years hui is now out.
You can download it here or check it out below.

This years theme is: Enterprising Communities: Innovation, change and Social Enterprise

There are big challenges and opportunities ahead in the world of resource recovery. What role do community recyclers have in creating positive change and what are some of the tools out there that can help?

Come join us for two days of discussion, debate, learning and fun.

For more info contact the CRN coordinator, Dorte Wray, on admin@communityrecyclers.org.nz.
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Para Kore Wānanga

Register now for the Para Kore Annual Wānanga [Conference]

Para Kore Wānanga details:
23rd – 25th of May 2014 (Powhiri Fri 5pm – Sun 1pm)
Pikitu Marae, Wiltsdown Road, Waotu (between Putaruru and Tokoroa)
$125 (subsidised cost, includes accommodation and kai)
More details on the registration form

Register here.

Nau mai, haere mai. Come and join the Para Kore whānau and learn how you can be part of creating a Zero Waste Aotearoa. We’ll be visiting Tapapa Marae, we’ll have guests such as Paul Murray, a brilliant zero waste educator, Sei Brown from Crosspower Ministries and Antonio Te Maioha performing spoken word.

There’ll be workshops on worm farming, buying local, how to get Para Kore started on your marae, what’s happening regionally, and waste auditing. From Friday through to Sunday you’ll have a programme full of zero waste topics, and you’ll emerge an inspired champion of the Para Kore philosophy. Entertainment, movies, visits, guest experts, worms, waste audits, and more!

We’re expecting iwi from all over Aotearoa to be attending, so don’t miss this opportunity to network and whakawhanaunga with the wider Para Kore whānau who are committed to making a difference.

This registration form is online, so please email me if you need help.

Noho ora mai i raro i ngā manaakitang
Jacqui Forbes
0210431127


August 2013 enews

This months eNews update has info on the CRN Hui, a new enterprise from North Canterbury Community Resources, news from WasteMINZ, pictures from the new Resource Recovery Centre in Whanganui and lots more.

Click here to download a PDF of the newsletter.


Rubbish Toursim

I’ve been lucky enough to be overseas for the last two months – in Europe and South America – and apart from having a very nice time visiting friends and interesting places I have been keeping an eye on the waste services in each of the countries.

The best two things I saw were the kerbside recycling in Scotland and the Container Deposit stations in Norway.

As I ventured out one morning in Edinburgh I came across a truck and three men (a driver who got out and helped, and two runners) sorting the recycling. The recycling bins were crates with special little raincoat covers, similar to a shower cap with elasticated plastic to keep the recycling dry in the case of rain.  The runners sorted the crates into holes in the side of the truck before returning the empty crate to the kerbside.  In addition to the collection services the promotion of recycling was very visible – many city bus stops had a sign attached to them encouraging people to recycle and the packaging included elaborate instructions on exactly how to recycle (or not) the material.

Norway is like many of the Scandinavian countries in that it has extremely high recycling standards. Households sort their recycling into a large number of categories including food waste and plastic film.

Container deposit legislation means that many of the containers are worth a small amount of money when returned to a container deposit stations. Such stations are common and often attached to supermarkets of all sizes. I visited one in Rjukan and was shown around the back end of the station where the reusable bottles and recyclable materials are sorted and stored for transportation.

The most shocking things were the rubbish piles in Argentina. Kerbside recycling as we know doesn’t seem to exist there yet. I did see a few big bins on the street in Buenos Aires where people could sort their recyclable materials into, but for the average householder there was nothing but a rubbish bin that everything went into. Each night the street corners would gather piles of rubbish, and I saw people going through the rubbish pulling both food and things that were of value out. Watching these people made me think of the Global Alliance of Wastepickers and the work the are doing to support the Wastepickers of the world http://globalrec.org/